Redhawks vs. Covid: Who’s Winning?

Campus Life * by Joseph Marziale

Joseph Marziale is a co-founder and co-owner of The JMAK. He specializes in mathematics and physics but discusses and researches topics in political philosophy and science, economics, social justice issues, popular mechanics, and the occasional music review. He is a sophomore at Roberts Wesleyan College.

As an extension of being compassionate to the concerns of others, we as students must realize that the present faculty and staff are working their hardest to serve us.

Really nobody wins from a deadly virus. But as athletes, we can choose the rate at which we adapt.

The short answer is the Redhawks. 

The longer is that we’re working on it, but we’re slowly opening up to the point of normalcy. Rapid, cyclical testing is giving athletes and staff a sense of security as students are testing negative for the virus on a daily basis. It gives them evidence that opening facilities and exercise rooms is worthwhile and safe to all users. However, this doesn’t come without its frustrations. Skeptics exist across the board who question the usefulness of masks, testing, vaccines, and the dreaded rules and restrictions. Many Redhawks view COVID-19 security measures as an oppressive threat to their liberties as students and athletes. Conversely, there are many others who, in the face of these skeptics, are confused at best and angered at worst. As cliché or centrist as it sounds, it’s incredibly important for individuals to understand and validate the concerns of both sides here. It’s ultimately OK to hold personal liberties to a high regard. It’s also reasonable to enjoy good health and to not want to get others sick. And as an extension of being compassionate to the concerns of others, we as students must realize that the present faculty and staff are working their hardest to serve us. They work to put rules in place for our own safety, that we might not have to go home in unison due to a virus that we, thus far, have fended off with an incredible, energetic vigilance. 

So before we get upset about how the racquetball court isn’t open, how the cardio room has a max capacity, and how we’re not in season yet, it’s critical to put on that aforementioned veil of thankfulness and humility. These are virtues that we’ve all had to work on during the pandemic; as the world’s understanding of the virus changes daily, we’re required to adapt accordingly. At this point, it’s the only thing that we can do, other than to continue in anger or frustration. Only then do the Redhawks truly win against Covid.